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Tuesday, 10 March 2015

The Sale of 'Justice'

The barristers are in a tizz because they recognise that the pattern of available work is being changed by the reckless policy of cuts being imposed by the government. In particular, they argue this week that the severe reduction in the availability of legal aid for civil cases [cases brought by one person or business against another] has almost completely been removed from smaller-value cases. This means that neither side can afford to employ a barrister to take the case to court: and the barrister profession as such calls this a denial of 'justice' to the litigants.

I can have no sympathy with them, as long as they harbour in their midst the sort of despicable character that attempts, in court, to blacken the characters of abused children as a form of mitigation for the appalling abuse that the defendants have undeniably committed. A recent case in Oxford Crown Court was darkened still further by the fact that one of the barristers who used this defence was a woman. This disgrace to the human race was defending in a criminal case, so her remuneration was provided by the taxpayer. While this is considered by the Bar Council to be acceptable conduct, the population should display utter contempt for the entire profession. Of course the tenants of the most expensive chambers in the Temple would never take such cases, and thus would not be tempted to use scurrilous tactics; but they do not act to elevate their lesser brethren from the mire in which they choose to wallow.

The sooner Britain's outrageous confrontational courts system is abolished, the better!

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